Moles - Seborrheic keratoses

Are you prone to seborrheic keratoses? How do you have them treated?

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What are seborrheic keratoses?

Seborrheic keratoses (SK) contain melanin but do not contain melanocytes, so they are not melanocytic nevi. Seborrheic keratoses are caused by a benign growth of epidermal cells. Some people call these growths "barnacles" or "Rice Krispies." Although they are most often medium brown, they can differ in color, ranging anywhere from light tan to black. They occur in different sizes. Typically, these growths are around the size of a pencil eraser or slightly larger. Some keratoses begin as a flat marks and gradually raise and thicken to form a seborrheic keratosis. A biopsy may, in some cases, be required to distinguish a seborrheic keratosis from an irregular mole or melanoma.

The telltale feature of a seborrheic keratosis is its waxy, stuck-on, greasy look. Seborrheic keratosis can almost be peeled or scraped off the skin while this is never true for melanocytic nevi. Seborrheic keratoses look like they have either been pasted on the skin or may look like a dab of melted brown candle wax that dropped on the skin. Seborrheic keratoses may occur in the same areas as moles. Seborrheic keratoses are also more common in areas of sun exposure but may rarely occur in sun-protected areas like the underwear area. When they first appear, the growths usually begin one at a time as small rough bumps. Eventually, they may thicken and develop a rough, warty surface. Seborrheic keratoses are quite common, especially after age 40. Almost everybody may eventually develop at least a few seborrheic keratoses during their lifetime. These growths are sometimes referred to as the "barnacles of old age."

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