Patient Comments: Angina - Diagnosis

How was the diagnosis of your angina established?

Comment from: ghweigel3, 45-54 Male (Patient) Published: February 04

About five years ago I was having problems with severe chest pains and was rushed to the hospital emergency room. After describing my chest pain I had an angiogram done and a chemical stress test was done the next day. The hospital doctor diagnosed me with angina and I was given Nitrostat to take when chest pains occur. I have been having chest pain about twice a month since then but recently the frequency of the pain increased to 2 or 3 times per week. Yesterday I saw my primary care doctor and explained my situation. I had and EKG and blood work done. I also have to have a chest x-ray and a chemical stress test done. She also prescribed Nitrostat and told me if chest pains persist after taking 3 Nitrostat pills to go to the emergency room at the hospital.

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Comment from: Kathleen, 65-74 Female (Patient) Published: October 31

My first serious episode was during a divorce and was diagnosed as a panic attack. I was 35 then. I had a few episodes over the years that were mild - always at times of high stress but I ignored them. When I was 64 and working on a very stressful project with a very tight deadline when I suddenly had an extreme heaviness in my chest and pain in my shoulder and neck. I was having trouble getting a good breath so I had my husband take me to the emergency room where they gave me nitroglycerin which relieved the pain. The EKG was normal but the kept me overnight because the pain reoccurred. A stress test the next morning was slightly abnormal. The cardiologist I was referred to believed I had GERD because my cholesterol levels are so low, so he referred me for an endoscopy. That was negative but that doctor thought I might have esophageal spasms. That didn't seem right since nitroglycerin helped so I was finally able to get in to see my mother's cardiologist, who doesn't take new patients, and got the final diagnosis. I have the rarer variant angina just like my mother and just like I told the first doctor in my family history!

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Comment from: Real Pain, 55-64 Female (Patient) Published: January 05

My angina was not diagnosed or even believed. I was kept in the hospital overnight and given blood tests, electrocardiograms and an echocardiogram. I was told I had spasms in my esophagus (even though I never even had heartburn). I only got the pain at night, and it would wake me up. Nitroglycerin relieved it immediately. Finally, after two months, I was given an angiogram and the 90% blockage was found. I could have had a heart attack at any time. By the way, I'm a woman, and I was 57 at the time.

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Comment from: gorda, 19-24 Female Published: May 24

I had a symptom that I experienced and don't know what it is. One night after I had a long day I was getting ready to go to sleep it was like around 3 or 4 in the morning as I turned to get in a comfortable position to go to sleep I felt my body heavy and like jello I tried to control myself but the feeling of not being able to breath and the pain in my chest was overwhelming. I managed to gasp for air enough to tell my boyfriend that I couldn't breathe then as he picked me up my body felt heavy and it would respond when I was trying to get up then I fainted and then I was in my hall and I saw how I was picked up from the floor but everything was blurry and the everything in my vision turned black that is when I got scared. The paramedics arrived later when I was a little bit better and then I was taken to the hospital but after all of this I started feeling pain on my neck to my shoulder from my left side but the hospital said that I was in good health.

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Comment from: littlejohn, 45-54 Male (Patient) Published: May 14

My angina was diagnosed as follows: The nurse asked me a series of questions, such as what I was doing at the time, did I feel sweaty, describe the pain and if I had ever had these symptoms before. I got hooked up to an ECG machine, and then a blood sample was taken. I believe the blood sample was to determine the level of heart enzymes present. My level was 4 so a second sample was taken and analyzed. It was lower, so I was released. Then the doctor told me it was likely angina, and I should go see my family doctor. The doctor also told me to return to the emergency room if symptoms reoccurred.

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Patient Comments

Viewers share their comments

Angina - Share Your Experience Question: Please describe your experience with angina.
Angina - Symptoms Question: What were the symptoms associated with your angina?
Angina - Causes Question: If known, what was the cause of your angina?
Angina - Other Chest Pain Experience Question: Please describe your experience with chest pain that was due to causes other than angina.
Angina - Treatment Question: What kinds of treatment, procedures, or medication did you receive for angina?
Angina- Medications Question: What medications were you prescribed to treat your angina? Describe the side effects.
Angina - Surgery Experience Question: Please describe your experience with angioplasty and coronary artery bypass surgery.
Angina - Calcium Scoring Question: Have you had CT scan calcium tests? Please share your experience, including results.

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